It started with porn

Deepfake is a new and powerful weapon in the arsenal available to the merchants of lies.

At the end of last year, a series of pornographic videos began showing up on the internet. This is nothing new, but these were different because they starred some of the world’s top actresses and singers. Naturally, they went viral: millions of people around the world saw them.

Very quickly it became clear that Scarlett Johansson, Taylor Swift, Katy Perry, and other artists were not the real protagonists of the sex videos, but rather the victims of a new technology that – using artificial intelligence and other advanced digital tools – allows their creators to insert anyone’s face into a very credible video.

Next-gen deepfakes can falsely put words in people’s mouths

Deepfake. It’s a word that’s entered the modern lexicon for all the wrong reasons.

Combining the phrase deep learning with the word fake, the AI image-processing technique can superimpose the likeness of one person onto a video of someone else.

Perhaps inevitably, the technology has become synonymous with pornography, with graphic videos apparently but falsely depicting celebrities now banned by Twitter, Reddit and even Pornhub.

Now, new research at Carnegie Mellon could take deepfakes to the next level with a technique called Recycle-GAN, which can take the detailed content of one video or performer and apply it to another, keeping the style of the latter intact.

This is a snippet from an article by New Atlas, read the full article…

XXX film company wants to put YOU in porn

Earlier this year, The Sun reported on a new app called “deepfakes” that created convincing face-swap videos using machine learning.

By scanning thousands of pictures of a person, it was possible to map their face onto someone else’s – with exceptional accuracy.

It soon emerged that pervs were using the tech to put celebrity faces on porn stars during sex scenes.

Now Naughty America says it wants to let randy porn punters put their own faces in adult movies using the same technology.

This is a snippet from an article by the Sun, visit the Sun for the full article…

Carnegie Mellon researchers create the most convincing deepfakes yet

Have you ever heard of “deepfakes”? Videos generated with artificial intelligence (AI) that learn to superimpose the face of one person onto the body of another have been used to swap Harrison Ford for Nicolas Cage in countless movie clips, and for far more nefarious purposes, like fake celebrity porn and propaganda.

Now, for better or worse, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new AI system that’s more powerful — and versatile — than previous attempts.

This is a snippet from an article by VentureBeat, check out the full article here…

‘Deepfake Porn’ And ‘Cyber-Flashing’

‘Deepfake Porn’ And ‘Cyber-Flashing’: The Other Abuses Not Included In New Upskirting Laws

‘It’s not that difficult to draft a law which covers all forms of image-based sexual abuse’

Upskirting, or taking a picture under a woman’s clothing without her consent, will soon become a specific criminal offence after the government agreed to a bill on the issue.

But experts are now saying that other sexual offences should be included in the bill too, arguing that other digital forms of abuse against women should also be addressed.

You can read the full article on TheHuffingtonPost

Pornhub promised to ban ‘deepfakes’ videos. And it failed miserably.

In February, Pornhub announced it would no longer tolerate AI-generated pornography featuring the facial features of celebrities over the bodies of adult actresses.

And it’s kept its promise, except… not really.

Quick take: Pornhub has become the ultimate “you had one job” meme.

You can read the full article on thenextweb

How deepfake porn is killing our trust in tech

Months after fake “celebrity porn” reared its head online, there’s a bad-tech aftertaste.

Clearly our sense of truth is morphing, with clever tricksters using AI to fool us. So how can we trust AI to tell us what’s real?

We’ve been manipulating the way we want to see the world — and how we want others to see us in it — for almost as long as humans have been able to paint or take photos.

“Look back through Hitler, Stalin, Mao or Castro, all of these people manipulated photos in an effort to change history,” says Hany Farid, a professor of computer science at Dartmouth College in the United States. “States do, bad actors do it, criminals do it and hoaxers do it.”

You can read the full article on brinkwire.com

‘deepfakes,’ the internet’s latest moral crisis

Where there’s innovation, there’s masturbation — at least in one dark corner of the internet, where nearly 80,000 people have gathered to share fabricated videos of celebrity women having sex and Nicolas Cage uncovering the Ark of the Covenant.

The technology is relatively easy to use, which has created an enthusiast community on Reddit (since banned), where users compare notes and swap their latest work: “Emma Watson sex tape demo ;-),” “Lela Star x Kim Kardashian,” and “Giving Putin the Trump face” among them.

You can read the full article on Mashable…

Porn producers offer to take down deepfake videos

Companies such as BaDoink are offering to assist Hollywood in getting deepfake content removed from the web, although they seem to agree that Deepfakes are here to stay and will be pretty much unstoppable.

“Given the rogue nature of Deepfakes, I don’t see how it can be effectively stopped,” agreed Alec Helmy, president and publisher of the adult industry publication XBiz.

“There’s an interesting world of artificial CGI porn that will be happening the next decade, where a fan can easily put any face on anybody in a porn scene,” agrees Grayson. “But I think of that for personal consumption rather than public humiliation.”

 

Deepfakes are technically legal

Remember when masturbating meant going onto Pornhub and looking up your favourite porn star’s videos?

Because we live in 2018 now, straightforward porn is beyond passé — it’s all about A.I. generated faux-A-lister smut from FakeApp now.

Celebrity publicists are probably cursing at their laptops right now, while their phones blow up with angry texts from their clients.

You can read the full article on papermag…